Flow Cytometry and Hematology

Flow Cytometry and Hematology

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  • Designing Panels for the Study of Hematopoietic Stem Cells
  • Flow Cytometric Analysis of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells and Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells in Lung Vascular Disease by Kewal Asosingh and Imaging Flow Cytometry in the Study of Immune Cell Functions by Andrew Filby
  • Flow Cytometry Analysis of Human Hematopoietic Progenitors in Cardiovascular Disease
  • A Guide to Choosing Fluorescent Protein Combinations for Flow Cytometric Analysis Based on Spectral Overlap

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/09/2019

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Andre Olsson, PhD Keywords: fluorescent proteins, spectral overlap, spillover spreading, cellprofiler

    About the Presenter

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    Andre Olsson, PhD
    Research Associate
    Lee Grimes Lab

    Andre received his PhD in experimental hematology at the Faculty of Medicine, Lund University in Sweden. In graduate school he studied the function of the ETO (Eight Twenty One) homologues and found that they are involved in regulating hematopoietic progenitor maintenance and lineage differentiation. As a research associate at Lee Grimes lab, he has focused on understanding myeloid lineage decisions during homeostasis. Hematopoiesis is a great system for studying cells and the processes that instruct the cells how to function. Flow cytometry enables people to study cells at a single cell level, and thus is a very powerful tool to map and characterize cells going through differentiation.

    Webinar Summary

    Fluorescent protein labeling of specific genes combined with surface marker profiling can more specifically identify a cell population. The advent of facile genome engineering technologies has made the generation of gene-expression or fusion-protein reporters more tractable. While there are a number of fluorescent proteins available, their choice as reporter constructs is made difficult by the lack of data on how sensitivity and other factors are affected when two or more fluorescent proteins are combined. We characterize the detection sensitivity, spectral overlap, and spillover spreading of 13 monomeric fluorescent proteins to determine their utility in multicolor panels.

    Learning Objectives

    • Describe how to consider fluorescent protein detection sensitivity for fusion-protein studies.
    • Learn how spectral overlap and spillover spreading impacts which fluorescent proteins to combine in an experiment.
    • Discuss how experimental validation is key to successful panel design.

    Who Should Attend

    Anyone interested in using fluorescent proteins in their in vivo or in vitro research.

    CMLE Credit: .5

  • Flow Cytometry Analysis of Human Hematopoietic Progenitors in Cardiovascular Disease

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/27/2016

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Thomas Cimato, MD, PhD Keywords: cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, hematopoietic stem cells, atherosclerosis progenitor cells, nutrition, ovarian cancer, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, monocyte, macrophages

    About the Presenter

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    Thomas Cimato, MD, PhD
    Associate Professor
    University at Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences

    Dr. Cimato is an associate professor in the Division of Cardiology at the University at Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and an adjunct investigator at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute.

    His research focuses on the role of inflammation on hematopoietic differentiation in atherosclerosis. He is also involved in collaborative studies that focus on the role of hematopoietic progenitor cells as immune suppressor cells in cancer.

    Webinar Summary

    In this webinar he will discuss recent advances in our understanding of how early hematopoietic progenitors respond to hypercholesterolemia and myocardial infarction in animal models to accelerate atherosclerosis. He will discuss the development of an assay to measure human hematopoietic progenitors in blood and early translational studies in human subjects with heart disease. 

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

  • Designing Panels for the Study of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/29/2020

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Dr. Steffen Schmitt and Dr. Marcus Eich Keywords: panel design, OMIP, history, autofluorescence, antibody titration

    About the Presenters

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    Dr. Steffen Schmitt
    German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)  

    Steffen Schmitt studied biology at the Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg and finished his PhD with a concentration in immunology. Subsequent to his postdoc, he developed the flow cytometric service at the Center for Natural and Medical Sciences (NMFZ) at Johannes-Gutenberg-University in Mainz. Since 2007 Steffen has headed the Flow Cytometry Core Facility of the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg.

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     Dr. Marcus Eich
     Hi-Stem gGmbH

    Marcus Eich studied biology at the Technical University Darmstadt and earned his PhD in 2011 in toxicology at the University Medical Center Mainz. After an additional postdoc in Mainz in 2015, he joined the HI-STEM team and the Flow Cytometry Core Facility of the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg.

    Webinar Summary

    The hematopoietic system is a very fascinating system to study as it can re-populate an entire system starting from just one cell. This webinar gives an overview of the targeted subpopulations of the hematopoietic system and how different experimental tasks and setups in one panel were combined. At the end, issues that occurred during the panel design are discussed and a short outlook is presented about how to further improve the panel.

    Learning Objectives

    • Understand the hematopoietic system from a backbone panel to specialized subpopulations, combining different experimental setups in panel design.
    • Apply tips and tricks for this panel.

    Who Should Attend

    PhD students, postdocs, and technicians involved in hematopoietic stem cell research.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0