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  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 08/08/2022 at 12:00 PM (EDT)

    A CYTO U Webinar presented Kewal Asosingh, PhD Keywords: Endothelial, flow cytometry, rare event detection

    About the Speaker

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    Kewal Asosingh, PhD
    Scientific Director
    Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute

    Dr. Asosingh is a principal investigator and scientific director for Flow Cytometry at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute. He is a past ISAC Scholar, Cytometry Part A Associate Editor, ISAC Flow Cytometry Content, and Education Committee member. His flow cytometric research is centered on lung vascular biology.

    Webinar Summary

    Endothelial cells are cells that reside in tissues and circulate in the bloodstream in small numbers. Immunophenotyping these cells has several challenges, like how to detect endothelial cells, how to gate them, and how to figure out if they're really endothelial. All of this will be covered in this webinar.

    Learning Objectives

    • Immunophenotype of murine and human circulating and organ-specific endothelial cells
    • Endothelial cell gating strategies and common pitfalls
    • The dos and don'ts of functional endothelial cell characterization

    Who Should Attend

    Flow cytometry SRL members and anyone interested in endothelial cell flow cytometry.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A CYTO Virtual Interactive 2021 Plenary presented by Paul Hutchinson, PhD, Swaine Chen, MD, PhD, and Sunghoon Kwon, PhD Antimicrobial resistance, clinical detection

    Overview

    Antimicrobial resistance occurs when pathogens change over time to no longer respond to medicines, making them much harder to treat and fueling the spread of disease. The alarming spread of muti- and pan-resistant bacterial “superbugs,” coupled with antibiotic shortages affecting countries at all stages of development and the paucity of the antimicrobial clinical pipeline have created a global emergency requiring innovative thinking to resolve. Quantitative cell sciences can provide improvements in the sensitivity and rapidity of clinical detection of antimicrobial resistance, help map and even predict of resistance patterns, and inform the development of robust and targeted antimicrobial approaches to meet this global challenge.

    Speakers

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    Paul Hutchinson, PhD
    Head of Flow Cytometry Laboratory, Immunology Programme
    National University of Singapore 

    Paul Hutchinson started in flow cytometry in 1983 at the Ruby Lynch Cell Sorter Lab, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute in Melbourne. In 1986, they joined the Department of Nephrology in Prince Henry’s Hospital to operate their cell sorter. During my time here I completed a Master of Science degree (Monash University) on macrophage function. In 1992, he joined the Clinical Immunology department at Monash Medical Centre and was in charge of the core flow cytometry facility which was used for both clinical tests and research. He concurrently completed my PhD (Monash University) on the use of flow cytometry to quantify immune function in kidney transplant recipients. After working 24 years in Melbourne, in February 2008 Dr. Hutchinson was appointed as the head of the Unidade de Citometria de Fluxo at the Instituo de Medicina Molecular in Lisbon, Portugal. This flow cytometry lab serviced more than 150 researchers, and had a cell sorter, and three analyzers. Since July 2009, he has been in charge of the core flow cytometry facility at the Life Sciences Institute of the National University of Singapore which has 4 analyzers and 3 cell sorters. Dr. Hutchinson is currently a member of the ISAC Live Education Task Force and has organized and participated in flow cytometry workshops in Singapore, Indonesia, India, Malaysia, and Vietnam since 2017. Besides running my SRF, he also pursues research interests in using flow cytometry to develop diagnostic tests for tuberculosis and investigating new technologies for making single cell measurements.

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    Swaine Chen, MD, PhD
    Group Leader
    Infectious Diseases
    Associate Professor of Medicine
    Genome Institute of Singapore,
    National University of Singapore

    Dr. Swaine Chen is an associate professor of medicine at the National University of Singapore and a Group Leader at the Genome Institute of Singapore. He received an AB in Chemistry and Mathematics from Harvard University in 1996 and an MD/PhD in developmental biology from Stanford University in 2004. His work combines his training in medicine, biology, chemistry, and mathematics to understand how and why bacteria are able to cause infections in humans. He specializes in the bacterial genetics (particularly in wild type clinical isolates), genomics, and animal models of infection, which together are used to understand pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance and devise new strategies to solve these problems.

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    Sunghoon Kwon, PhD
    Professor
    Department of Electrical Engineering
    Seoul National University
    CEO, QuantaMatrix Corp

    Dr. Sunghoon Kwon is a professor of electrical engineering/medicine at the Seoul National University in Korea, leading biophotonics and nanoengineering laboratory. He received an BS in elecrical engineering and MS in medical engineering from Seoul National University in 1998 and 2000. He received PhD in bioengineering from University of California at Berkeley in 2004. He is also founder and CEO of QuantaMatrix providing life-saving diagnostic device in the field of clinical microbiology. His work combines his training in medicine, biology, engineering to invent innovative technologies helping life scientists since he believes important scientific discovery and medical innovation starts with development of innovative tools. His research area includes rapid antibiogram, DNA synthesis, single cell multiomics, and next generation immune imaging. 


    CMLE Credit: 1.0

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Felix J. Hartmann, PhD Keywords: Cellular metabolism, tumor immunology, multiplexed imaging

    Want this webinar for free? Upgrade to Gold or Platinum membership here! https://isac-net.org/page/Memb...

    Preview of Webinar

    About the Speaker

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    Felix J. Hartmann, PhD
    Helmholtz Young Investigator
    German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany

    Dr. Hartmann received a BSc and MSc in molecular biotechnology from the University of Heidelberg, Germany and his PhD from the University of Zurich, Switzerland for his research on T cell effector functions in human autoimmune diseases. In 2017, he joined Stanford University as a postdoctoral fellow to study anti-tumor immunity and its metabolic regulation. Since 2021, Dr. Hartmann is an independent group leader at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. His research combines single-cell and imaging proteomic technologies with novel biological assays to reveal interactions of immune cells with their local environment and how these interactions impact clinical outcome in human cancer. Most recently, he has developed a novel approach that enables analysis of cellular metabolism in individual cells and with spatial resolution.

    Webinar Summary

    Cellular metabolism regulates immune cell activation, differentiation and effector functions, but current metabolic approaches lack single-cell resolution and simultaneous characterization of cellular phenotype. In this webinar you will learn about a novel approach to characterize the metabolic regulome of single cells together with their phenotypic identity. The method, termed single-cell metabolic regulome profiling (scMEP), quantifies proteins that regulate metabolic pathway activity using high-dimensional antibody-based technologies. You will learn how mass cytometry (cytometry by time of flight, CyTOF) was employed to benchmark scMEP against bulk metabolic assays by reconstructing the metabolic remodeling of in vitro-activated naive and memory CD8+ T cells. You will see the approach being applied to clinical samples to identify tissue-restricted, metabolically repressed cytotoxic T cells in human colorectal carcinoma. Combining the method with multiplexed ion beam imaging by time of flight (MIBI-TOF), allowed uncovering of the spatial organization of metabolic programs in human tissues, which indicated exclusion of metabolically repressed immune cells from the tumor–immune boundary. Overall, the approach described in this webinar enables robust approximation of metabolic and functional states in individual cells.

    Learning Objectives

    • Understand the concept of metabolic regulome profiling using antibodies and its relationship with cellular metabolism
    • See how metabolic regulome profiling was implemented using high-dimensional mass cytometry (CyTOF) and multiplexed ion beam imaging (MIBI)
    • Realize the potential of this approach for clinical biomarker discovery

    Who Should Attend

    Scientists at all levels interested in cellular metabolism, immunology and cancer research, singe-cell analysis and imaging

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

  • Contains 6 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Jessica Perea Houston, PhD The event will include a live discussion with the speaker about her contribution in promoting equality and inclusion in the field. Keywords: Women in science, cytometry instrumentation, diversity & inclusion

    Webinar Preview

    About the Speaker

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    Jessica Houston, PhD
    Professor
    New Mexico State University

    Jessica Perea Houston, PhD, is a professor in chemical & materials engineering at New Mexico State University (NMSU) in Las Cruces, NM (2009-present). Jessica received her PhD in chemical engineering from Texas A&M University (2005) and was a director’s postdoctoral fellow at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Bioscience Division (2006-2009). She is an alumna of NMSU (’00) and is from Santa Fe, NM.

    Her research expertise is biomedical instrumentation development with an emphasis on time-resolved flow cytometry systems development, biophotonics, and optofluidics. Jessica directs a flow cytometry instrumentation lab at NMSU, has advised over 60 graduate students, undergraduate students and/or postdocs throughout the 12.5 years she has been at NMSU. Her research is currently supported by a National Institutes of Health R01 grant “Microflow time-resolved flow cytometry for FRET and Fluorescent Protein Development.”

    Jessica has been active in multidisciplinary research projects that have involved many collaborators, institutions, and international partners. She and her team have presented over 400 abstracts at conferences that range from local to international. She has published over 50 papers related to her research, has one patent, and has been invited to over 30 different colloquia and conferences, where she has made formal invited presentations related to her research. Jessica was a Faculty Fulbright Scholar in Japan for 6 months in 2018. She has received numerous grants and awards including her current NIH R01 award and the NSF CAREER award in 2012. She became a Scholar of the International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry in 2012 and won Best Paper in the journal Cytometry Part A in 2015. She has also received many awards at NMSU including the Synergy-One award (NMSU College of Engineering) Outstanding Junior Faculty (NMSU Hispanic Faculty and Staff Caucus); the Early Career Award (NMSU Research Council) and the Distinguished Career Award (NMSU Office of the Vice President for Research)

    Jessica is currently associate editor for the Journal, Cytometry Part A and is a standing member of the Cell & Molecular Technologies Study Section for the National Institutes of Health Center for Scientific Review. Jessica has been actively involved in ISAC for 10 years and a member of ISAC for 16 years. She is ISAC Treasurer and Chair of the Finance Committee. She is also an executive committee member ISAC. She helped found the CYTO Women taskforce within ISAC and has been chair of the Scientific Communications Committee. She was on Council from 2012-2016. Jessica also is/has been a member of the following committees: Scholars, Leadership Development, CYTO Women, Transition & Personnel, Committee Liaison Collective, Mission Continuity, Awards, Nominating, CYTO Planning, and Fundraising. She has continued to participate in the planning of the CYTO congress and has attended most CYTO meetings since 2008. In other organizations, Jessica is a leader—she was chair of the entire Biophotonics session for the Conference on Lasers and Optics (CLEO) for 3 years (2017-2019). In 2021 Jessica was invited to co-chair the Photonics West BiOS Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues conference in San Francisco, CA.

    Jessica also has experience participating, learning, and working in the general area of diversity and inclusion. As a Hispanic female, Jessica has been quite interested in advancing minority initiatives. She is involved in many minority societies and programs, and attends workshops and meetings related to underrepresented minority (URM) priorities. She was a participant in the 2015 cohort of the Linton-Poodry SACNAS Leadership Institute, attended several Society of STEM Women of Color retreats and is a SSWOC member. She has participated in the 2019 AAHHE (American Association of Hispanics in Higher Ed) conference to formulate a strategic plan with the NMSU Vice President for Research. She and her students regularly attend the SACNAS and ABRCMS annual meetings. She participates in many workshops related to diversity in STEM including recent ones held on An Inclusive Academy: Achieving Diversity and Excellence (by authors: Abigail Stewart and Virginia Valian) and a Women in STEM book club. She has advised more than 30 minority undergraduates in research, and seven graduate students and postdocs. In total Jessica has mentored more than 50 undergraduates in research, advised six PhD degrees and eight MS degrees. She is now mentoring two minority RISE PhD students, one minority MARC undergraduate researcher, three minority undergraduate research students, and two postdoctoral fellows.

    Webinar Summary

    In cytometry, quantitative interpretation of cell function and morphology at a single-cell level can be accomplished through many different approaches that range in how the detectors function, excitation light is delivered, cells are moved (fluidics), and data are processed. Moreover, cytometers have been adapted for imaging, mass spectrometry, full spectral analyses, unique sorting/lab-on-a-chip approaches, and machine learning. Yet among the plethora of ways a cell can be quantified as it passes a laser beam, fluorescence decay is rarely captured. The average time fluorescent molecules within the cell spend in the excited state is typically ignored because of the challenges related to evaluating fluorescence lifetimes at a high throughput. Over several years, our laboratory has taken cytometers and introduced a variety of lifetime technologies onto these systems for analysis and sorting. Lifetime sensing with cytometry is achievable using a wide range of cytometric architectures. Some examples of these approaches will be discussed, as will new protocols and applications we are developing. The main cellular assays that we focus on include measurements of Förster resonance energy transfer and metabolic mapping of cells by NAD(P)H lifetime sensing. It is non-trivial to capture heterogeneous time-resolved information from several different excitable molecules when excitation is observed from single cells and particles in fluidic states. Therefore, the opportunities for addressing such challenges will also be presented. Additionally, the experiences had by Dr. Houston during her career will be discussed including current opportunities for diversifying academia and the challenges for women in engineering.


    Learning Objectives

    • Discuss the benefits of time resolved flow cytometry
    • Compare and contrast lifetime analysis for imaging and cell sorting
    • List various ways in which lifetime as a cytometric parameter enhances cytometry assays and protocols 
    • Discuss current challenges faced in academia by women in STEM
    • List opportunities for enhancing diversity at your institution and developing plans for inclusion and equity.

    Who Should Attend

    The broad cytometry community and scientists interested in topics related to diversity and inclusion.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

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  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/02/2022

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Rafael J. Argüello, PhD Keywords: immunometabolism, functional method, flow cytometry, single cell resolution, SCENITH

    Preview of Webinar


    About the Speaker

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    Rafael J. Argüello, PhD
    Center of Immunology of Marseille Luminy 

    Rafael Argüello studied biology at the University of Buenos Aires and did his PhD in immunology. He is a tenured CNRS researcher and leader of the immuno metabolism and translation team, in the DeCiBEL laboratory at the Centre d'Immunologie de Marseille Luminy (CIML, France). In 2020 he patented and published SCENITH (PCT/EP2020/060486) and became a Marylou Ingram Scholar of the International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry. He has been awarded with grants as PI from Canceropole, Inserm tranfert, ImmunoX UCSF, ECOS-Sud, Centuri and ANR Young Investigator award 2021. He has recent publications in Cell Metabolism, Cell, Nature immunology, Nature Cancer and EMBO Journal and has created a large collaborative network to study immunometabolism ex-vivo. 

    Webinar Summary

    Interest in immunometabolism is growing exponentially due to its implication in infection, autoimmunity, cancer, and immunotherapies. However, studying immunometabolism ex-vivo has been technically challenging for the last decades. In the last two years, efforts from many different labs have generated a toolbox of functional and phenotypic markers that allow to characterize the metabolic profile of immune cells by flow cytometry. In this webinar we will overview, update, and compare the different tools available and guide you to perform your first immunometabolic studies by flow cytometry. 

    Learning Objectives

    In this webinar you will learn the latest advances in single cell technologies to study immunometabolism. (I will NOT be speaking about the Krebs cycle.) You will learn about functional and phenotypic tools to study metabolism by flow cytometry. In particular, you will learn to interpret experiments and results from SCENITH and other methods.

    Who Should Attend 

    Master, PhD, Postdocs, and PIs interested to explore the immunometabolism field by flow cytometry.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 12/08/2021

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Kylie Price and Dagna Sheerar Keywords: Novel funding sources, philanthropy, relationship building, instrument procurement, infrastructure

    About the Speakers

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    Kylie Price
    Head of Research Technology and Senior Staff Scientist
    Malaghan Institute of Medical Research

    Kylie Price is a senior scientist and the head of research technology at the Malaghan Institute of Medical Research. She has 18 years of experience providing strategic, scientific, and operational direction in multidisciplinary environments. Kylie has strong stakeholder management and engagement skills and has attracted more than $15 million of philanthropic funding over the past twelve years, supporting the creation of a distinguished center of research excellence, the Hugh Green Cytometry Centre (HGCC). Kylie leads a team of eight highly-skilled technology scientists in providing supporting to over 80 scientists at the Malaghan Institute. The HGCC provides access to cutting-edge technology platforms (including flow and spectral cytometry, histology, bioimaging, genomics, and bioinformatics) and advises multiple research groups both nationally and abroad. Kylie also has a strong leadership track-record that includes organizing high-profile networking events, such as CYTO Asia Singapore 2017, and directing international organizations, such as the Australasian Cytometry Society of which she is former president. Kylie is a two-time NZ Woman of Influence Awards finalist and finalist of the 2021 NZ High Tech Awards. She was the first New Zealander elected to the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry Council and was elected ISAC Secretary in 2020.

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    Dagna Sheerar

    Flow Cytometry Technical Director
    University of Wisconsin
    Carbone Cancer Center Flow Cytometry Laboratory

    Dagna Sheerar has been working in flow cytometry shared resource laboratories for over 20 years and is currently the technical director of the Flow Cytometry Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin - Madison Carbone Cancer Center. Her areas of interest are core management and user education. Since becoming technical director, Dagna has successfully added, on average, one instrument per year to the Flow Lab through various grant programs, institutional purchases, or “crowd funding.” Dagna has been involved in the Great Lakes International Imaging and Flow Cytometry Association (GLIIFCA) for almost as long as she has been working in cores, and she recently served as GLIIFCA president from 2020-2021. She is a member of ISAC and serves on the SRL Content Task Force. She serves as host, organizer, and instructor for the Annual Course in Cytometry, and she is currently in the planning stages for the 45th Annual Course to be held at the University of Wisconsin in June of 2022. Dagna has presented at GLIIFCA, the annual CYTO Meeting, and the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facility (ABRF) annual meetings. Dagna also served as the Interim Director of Campus Research Cores at UW – Madison in 2020.  

    Webinar Summary

    There is often a lot of pressure on SRL managers to run a partial- or full-cost-recovery core facility which presents many challenges. Identifying and securing external funding (in any form) can alleviate this pressure. This tutorial will cover various funding strategies for SRLs, looking at diversifying funding streams. Dagna Sheerar will provide an overview of traditional and novel methods for funding the purchase of instrumentation, including various grant programs, institutional purchases, and “crowd-funding.” Kylie Price will look at how to find, maintain, and grow philanthropic relationships as well as how to maximize opportunities with high-net-worth individuals/groups.

    Learning Objectives

    • Identify novel funding sources for shared resource laboratories.
    • Leveraging usage data and research need to build support.
    • How best to present core technologies and core facility services to entice funding.
    • How to engage stakeholders.
    • Provide tips around how to build and grow philanthropic relationships.

    Who Should Attend

    SRL Managers, Flow Core Directors, SRL Staff.


    CMLE Credit: 1.0

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Marta Monteiro, PhD and Julie Auger Keywords: SRL, benchmarking, quality assurance

    About the Speakers

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    Marta Monteiro, PhD
    Head of Flow Cytometry & Antibodies
    Core Facility Speaker
    Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência

    Marta has a PhD in immunology from the University of Paris. She is head of Flow Cytometry & Antibodies at the Gulbenkian Institute for Science (IGC), in Portugal, and also the core facility speaker, representing all IGC facilities. Before that, Marta worked as a researcher for 15 years in Portugal and abroad and was an assistant professor at he Medical School of University of Lisbon. She also was the head of the R&D department of a multinational pharmaceutical company. She is author of many scientific publications and co-inventor of a patent that was an award-winning entrepreneurship project and the foundation of a start-up. With her strong scientific know-how and practical input in core facility management, Marta also collaborates with Agendo for business development and marketing.

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    Julie Auger
    Executive Director
    Research Core Facilities Program
    University of California Davis

    Julie A. Auger, has been a member of the cytometry community since 1985 and is widely recognized for her expertise in the operation and administration of multi-technology, multidisciplinary academic resource centers. She serves as the executive director of the Research Core Facilities Program at the University of California Davis where she is responsible for development of a central support structure to optimize organization and administration for over 100 shared research facilities. Prior to her current position at UC Davis, Julie developed similar programs at UC San Francisco and The University of Chicago. She developed her core facility management expertise at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and at the University of Chicago, where she developed internationally-reputed flow cytometry core facilities.

    Webinar Summary

    At research institutions, shared resource laboratories (SRLs) managers face increasing expectations to maximize facility usage and optimize operation. Benchmarking is a helpful exercise for organizations to identify their strengths and opportunities for development with the aim of maximizing performance. External assessment of the SRLs can be used as a benchmarking strategy to perform an objective and unbiased analysis of the standpoint of those services, providing valuable recommendations for improvement on different areas. In this webinar, we will present a successful case study of a first external assessment of the scientific core facilities of a research institution. We will provide an overview of the different steps, from the initial engagement of the entire community to prepare the exercise, to the benefits it conveyed and that are seen at present.

    Learning Objectives

    • Usefulness of benchmarking for SRLs.
    • Different steps of an external assessment process of SRLs.
    • Benefits that an external assessment process of SRLs can bring to an entire institution.
    • Definition of Key Performance Indicators/metric for SRLs.

    Who Should Attend

    SRLs managers, SRLs technicians, institutional executive and scientific managers.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Dr. Kewal Asosingh Keywords: Solid tissue, disaggregation, single-cell suspension

    About the Speaker

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    Dr. Kewal Asosingh
    Scientific Director for Flow Cytometry
    Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute

    Dr. Asosingh is a principal investigator and scientific director for flow cytometry at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute. He is a past ISAC Scholar, Cytometry Part A associate editor, ISAC Flow Cytometry Content subcommittee chair, and member of the Education Committee. He has more than 20 years of experience in solid tissue disaggregation into a single-cell suspension.

    Webinar Summary

    A good single-cell prep is essential for any flow cytometry and single-cell omics experiment. This webinar outlines the principles and provides a general guide of steps to consider for solid tissue disaggregation.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Basics of solid tissue composition.
    • What is a “good” single-cell prep in flow cytometry and single-cell RNAseq experiments?
    • The dos and don’ts in designing a tissue disaggregation protocol.
    • Evaluation of the quality of a single cell prep and common pitfalls. 

    Who Should Attend

    Flow cytometry SRL staff and anyone performing flow cytometry using solid tissue as starting material. 

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/13/2021

    A CYTO U Webinar presented by Sherry Thornton, PhD and Julia Fernandez-Rodriguez, PhD Keywords: grants, funding, SRL, tips and tricks for funding, funding sources

    About the Speakers

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    Sherry Thornton, PhD
    Professor of Rheumatology
    Director, Research Flow Cytometry Core

    Dr. Sherry Thornton been involved in flow cytometry for over 19 years both in projects as an investigator and in provision of services as a core director. She is a field service professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (UCCOM) in the Division of Rheumatology at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC). Her main role is to direct the research flow cytometry core and provide services to over 190 investigators and their labs both at CCHMC and UCCOM. She is highly involved in education and shared facilities nationally and internationally. She currently serves as chair of the Education Committee of the International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) and is a past chair and current member of the Flow Cytometry Research Group for Association for Biomedical Resource Facilities (ABRF). She also was involved in the launching and the continuation of the ABRF mentorship program as a member of the Career Development Committee. In striving to provide education and state-of-the-art flow cytometry for core users, she has been supported by two NIH P30 grant mechanisms for over 15 years and has been awarded two NIH Shared Instrumentation Grants to provide access to user-friendly based cell sorting 24/7 and high parameter flow cytometry. 

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    Julia Fernandez-Rodriguez, PhD
    Sahlgrenska Academy
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden

    Julia's research career in cell and molecular biology and core facility training experience has provided her with an excellent background in multiple life sciences disciplines, as well as in the management, operation, and coordination of an imaging research infrastructure and its training activities at the national and international level. Since 2003 Julia has been responsible of the Centre for Cellular Imaging, an open-access Correlated Multimodal Imaging Facility that provides technical and scientific excellence by integrating multiple imaging technologies with image processing and analysis tools in a single core. Julia's main interest is to provide expertise in correlated multimodal imaging workflows (from experimental design to image acquisition and analysis) tailored to various research domains within the life sciences. In 2016, Julia was awarded one of the 15 Research Infrastructure Fellows grants by the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research. At the university core facility, Julia is also involved in the education and training of students and researchers through a series of courses, seminars, and workshops, often in collaboration with other universities in Sweden and abroad and with industrial partners. Julia's responsibility is to organize and lead these events and ensure that the scientific community receives the appropriate basic or advanced training on different microscopy methods. Julia's overall aim is to have students and researchers foster a deep understanding of basic and advanced methods used in microscopy to tackle their questions about the most appropriate probes and instruments. Furthermore, she has supervised core internship students in bioimaging, promoting future career possibilities and introducing core facility work as a possible career direction. At the national level, she is the scientific coordinator of the National Microscopy Infrastructure in Sweden and a member of the Boards of the Nordic Microscopy Society (SCANDEM) and the Bridging Nordic Microscopy Infrastructure (NordForks). Julia is also connected to several other European facilities such as the European Light Microscopy Initiative, ELMI (member of the Steering committee since 2008), and the Euro-BioImaging ERIC consortium (member of the Nodes Board). She is also president of the Core Technologies for Life Sciences Association (CTLS). Further, she represent Sweden in the Management Committee and is the coordinator of the Short-Term Scientific Missions of the European COST Action COMULIS (CA17121) -funded network in Correlated Multimodal Imaging in Life Sciences.

    Webinar Summary

    Participants are invited to learn tips and tricks regarding funding for shared resource laboratories (SRL). Speakers will address NIH and European funding sources, focusing on how participants can support their cytometry SRL through instrumentation or other grant mechanisms.

    Learning Objectives

    • Identify funding sources for shared resource laboratories.
    • Determine basic requirements for successful core laboratory grant submissions.
    • Provide specific tips for successful grant submissions.
    • Determine common pitfalls for grant applications.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/12/2021

    A CYTO U webinar presented by Florian Mair, PhD and Thomas Liechti, PhD Keywords: Dendritic cells, Monocytes, High-dimensional flow cytometry, Panel design, Unsupervised data analysis

    About the Presenter

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    Thomas Liechti, PhD
    Postdoctoral Researcher
    ImmunoTechnology Section
    Vaccine Research Center
    National Institutes of Health

    Thomas Liechti obtained his PhD in immunology and microbiology at the University of Zurich in 2017 and is currently a postdoctoral researcher in Mario Roederer’s group at the Vaccine Research Center of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda (USA). His main interest is high-dimensional flow cytometry and human immunology. During his postdoctoral training, he established a 28-color flow cytometry sample processing and analysis pipeline to assess the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to human immune homeostasis in a cohort of more than 3000 individuals.  


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    Florian Mair, PhD
    Research Associate | Cytometry Specialist
    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

    Florian Mair graduated with a PhD from the University of Zurich, Switzerland, in 2014 and is currently working at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, USA, as a research associate. During the past decade, he has been involved extensively with different cytometry platforms (conventional, spectral and mass cytometry) as well as scRNA-seq techniques and developed an interest in applying novel analysis approaches for single cell data. He has been actively engaged in teaching flow cytometry courses, including systematic panel design and analysis of high-dimensional cytometry experiments. 

    Webinar Summary

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytes are critical components of the innate immune system and important for orchestrating adaptive immunity. In recent years high-dimensional single cell technologies, such as flow cytometry and single cell RNA-seq, dissected the heterogeneity of human DCs and monocytes more precisely, suggesting more robust markers to unequivocally define these subsets. Based on these results and our recently published phenotype report (Mair F. and Liechti T. Cytometry Part A, 2021), we will discuss strategies to better define and characterize human DCs and monocytes using a combination of traditional and recently discovered markers. We will show practical examples of how the combination of thorough panel design and unsupervised data analysis can help to dissect heterogenous immune populations. This webinar will be split into three parts:

    • A description about the phenotypic and functional characteristics of human DC and monocyte subsets with a focus on how the emergence of single-cell technologies improved our understanding of the heterogenous landscape of human phagocytes.
    • High-dimensional panel design for characterization of human DCs and monocytes with a more specific focus on marker selection and the incorporation of biological knowledge into this process.
    • An overview of how unsupervised data analysis approaches can improve the delineation of human DC and monocyte subsets.

    Learning Objectives

    • Learn about the phenotypic and functional characteristics of human DCs and monocytes.
    • Understand strategies for marker selection in high-dimensional flow cytometry panel design.
    • Learn how unsupervised data analysis can guide the analysis of human DCs and monocytes.

     Who Should Attend

    Scientist interested in studying human dendritic cells and monocytes using flow cytometry. In addition, flow cytometrists with a general interest in high-dimensional flow cytometry panel design.

    CMLE Credit: 1.0